You do have the option, with an electronic wheel, of scrolling RGB,RGB etc but the frustration factor is real enough, as you say. I'm really drawn to the Altair Hypercam 183M (the one Trevor uses on Astrobackyard) I understand it will take much longer to image (like 3 or 4 times) however I also understand it can produce better images (read: cleaner/clearer) due to capturing more light. There is a lot to learn in post processing, much of which you will achieve using data collected with a DSLR camera. Here is a side-by-side look at some of the sensors using CCD technology. I would consider getting L,R,B first as you can always use a synthetic green if you have to. This is the Heart Nebula in two hours, 20 mins per colour and an hour in Ha from a mono CCD. Yes mono is faster and better if you know what your doing, how to use it efficiently and have plenty clear nights. My advice is save yourself the frustration, greater expense and complexity of mono CCD imaging, by getting a pre-owned (modified if possible) 600D, or similar and start to learn the hobby. (I used both OSC and mono versions of the same CCD camera for this. CMOS sensor performance is catching up or even surpassing the performance of CCD’s. Don't do so because OSC is faster. Thanks to each and every one of you. This portal supports and promotes the different services proposed by the market research & strategy consulting company Yole Développement and its partners System Plus Consulting, Blumorpho and PISEO. CCD RIU’s have been the main technology in C-arm units for multiple decades, and they still hold a strong position in cost-sensitive C-arm applications. These cookies relate to services provided by third parties, such as "Like" and "Share" buttons. To summarise, get a cheap secondhand DSLR and get started. So, if I asked you to go buy a camera for astro use for me, what would you buy and why. However, recent shifts in the manufacturing have left the future of C-arm technology for economy systems up in the air as CCD sensors face obsolescence. These alternatives need to be part of the new generation of technology that is growing in the healthcare field, as CCD sensors are disappearing. It came up cheap on this forum so I bought it. CCD image sensors are a key component of camera lens assemblies that, together with an image intensifier, forms an RIU used for x-ray imaging and have been a staple in C-arms for decades. Nebula, galaxies, planets, the moon the sun???? Sign up for a new account in our community. The emergence of new technology is partnered with a new generation of doctors who are more receptive to changes in diagnostic images. The largest manufacturers of CCD technology are no longer producing, with very few options left. You do have the option, with an electronic wheel, of scrolling RGB,RGB etc but the frustration factor is real enough, as you say. I just load up my L,R and B and make sure channel interpolation is checked. Do save up for what you need, but use the DSLR to get the hang of imaging and help decide what targets you want to focus on. Somewhere in the back of my mind I feel a dedicated astro cam is calling me.. I wouldn't 'rubbish' DSLRs or one shot colour cameras but dedicated astronomical cameras are certainly the best for the job. That said, perhaps when I'm shooting those tricky low down southerly targets when time on target is limited then RGB, RGB, etc. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy. Login to access to our Analysts' presentations on all expertise. The voltage is sampled at the pixel, digitized on the imager, and cleared for the next frame. Choose OSC over mono by all means, but do so for the right reasons. Mono is also easier if you plan to try narrowband imaging. Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Use this to learn the craft and keep your change for accessories/software you need or future upgrades. A DSLR can be used as is with camera lenses, CCD mono ( not much point buying CCD/ CMOS colour) needs all sorts of other expensive bits and bobs to capture images. My favourite example is this one. However, recent shifts in the manufacturing have left the future of C-arm technology for economy systems up in the air as CCD sensors face obsolescence. £1k won't go far I'm afraid. CMOS images tend to have more noise and need more light to create images at the proper exposure. By Conceptual diagrams illustrating the difference between CCD and CMOS imaging chip architectures. I'd take the opportunity to consider what most attracted me to imaging, then draw up an acquisition plan for necessary purchases over a few years. £1k absolute ceiling - Wife says so!). Digital x-rays are faster, require less radiation and provide more diagnostic images that also can be used for enhanced patient education and treatment proposals. I do like the stars/moon and have recently discovered the planets however I have to admit, I love the colours, so predominantly that will be my thing. CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor) and CCD (Charge Coupled Device) are both types of sensors used in digital imaging. I started using my (not inexpensive) Canon 70D dslr - which is my only camera - and was not too happy the first time I fetched it in afer a long night of imaging only to discover it was soaked/dripping with dew. With a puzzled look on his face he asked me why as I have a DSLR? If you buy wisely then you can use this whilst you save a few more pennies for a dedicated ccd/cmos and sell it at cost or minimal lose as they do hold their price very well. I don’t recall seeing anything like that, but I’ll have another look and ask on their user forum.