Liberality (117), which is opposed by covetousness (118) and prodigality (119). Restitution (62), which would seem to be an act of commutative justice. God's knowledge; the ideas which exist in His knowledge. VICES: Hatred (34), which is opposed to charity itself. VICES (VOLUNTARY COMMUTATIONS): Sins that are committed in relation to voluntary commutations include cheating (77) in buying and selling, and usury (78) in loans. Sloth (35) and envy (36), which are opposed, respectively, to our own joy and the joy of our neighbor. After the general treatise of virtues and vices, and other things connected with the matter of morals, we must now consider each of these things in particular. GIFT: The corresponding gift of prudence, which is counsel (52). The religious state: its requirements (186), its proper realm (187), its variations (188) and the entrance into religious life (189). PRECEPTS: The precepts (170) of temperance. There is a search engine in the main Logic Museum which allows for selective Google searches on the main Latin sites on the Web (including this one). TEMPERANCE ITSELF: The virtue of temperance (141) and its contrary vices (142). PARTS (GENERAL): The distinction between commutative and distributive justice (61). VICES: Unbelief in general (10), heresy (11), apostasy (12), blasphemy in general (13) and against the Holy Ghost (14). summa theologiae - thomas aquinas This page is the beginning of a project to set the whole of Aquinas' Summa Theologiae into parallel Latin-English. GIFT: The corresponding gift (139) of fortitude. Three of these are theological, and of these we must treat first, while the other four are the cardinal virtues, of which we shall treat afterwards (Question 47). The life of God. CONNECTED VIRTUES (PIETY): Piety (101) and its opposite vices. PARTS: Its parts in general (128). Second Part of the Second Part (Secunda Secundæ Partis) After the general treatise of virtues and vices, and other things connected with the matter of morals, we must now consider each of these things in particular. Three of these are theological, and of these we must treat first, while the other four are the cardinal virtues, of which we shall treat afterwards (Question 47). CONNECTED VIRTUES (GENERAL): The quasi-potential parts of justice are the virtues connected with justice, in general (80) and specifically. 4.7 out of 5 stars 48. Specifically, magnanimity (129) and its opposing vices of presumption (130), ambition (131) and vainglory (132)—which are all opposed by excess—and pusillanimity (133), which is opposed by deficiency. GENERAL: Hope in itself (17). Vices opposed to peace: discord (37), contention (38), schism (39), war (40), strife (41) and sedition (42). GIFTS (SPEECH): The grace of tongues (176) and the gratuitous grace consisting in words (177). How does the soul know itself? The distinction between commutative and distributive justice, Superstition, idolatry, divination, sacrilege, Other forms of temperance and intemperance; Continence, modesty, humility; incontinence, pride, The division of life into active and contemplative, Man's various duties and states in general; the religious state and its requirements. CONNECTED VIRTUES (OBSERVANCE): Observance itself (102). Through what does it know them and how? Sloth (35) and envy (36), which are opposed, respectively, to our own joy and the joy of our neighbor. The purpose of this site is to provide a Google-searchable facility on key phrases of Latin thirteenth-century scholastic writing, directly cross-referenced to the Dominican translation, which is literal, and generally good. JUSTICE ITSELF: Right (57), justice (58), injustice (59) and judgment (60). PRECEPTS: The precepts (140) of fortitude. PRECEPTS: The precepts (16) of faith, knowledge and understanding. Those (5) who have faith. On the Simplicity of God 4. The parts of lust (154). Liberality (117), which is opposed by covetousness (118) and prodigality (119). Art, however, does not pertain to moral science, which is concerned with things to be done, for art is right reason about things to be made, as stated above (I-II:57). CONNECTED VIRTUES (PIETY): Piety (101) and its opposite vices. VICES (DISTRIBUTIVE): Respect of persons (63), which is opposed to distributive justice. The act of faith (2), especially the outward act of faith (3). Each quasi-integral part (49) of prudence. PARTS (GENERAL): The distinction between commutative and distributive justice (61). The other moral virtues are all in some way reducible to the cardinal virtues, as was explained above (I-II:61:3). Scandal (43), the vice opposed to beneficence. In connection with the other voluntary commutations no special kind of sin is to be found distinct from rapine and theft. Faith FAITH ITSELF: The object of faith (1). Paperback. Only 2 left in stock - order soon. GIFTS (MIRACLES): The grace of miracles (178). Truth (109), which is opposed by lying (110), dissimulation and hypocrisy (111), boasting (112), and irony (113). The contemplative (180) and active (181) lives specifically. Surprisingly, however, there does not yet exist an affordable, high-quality edition of the saint’s greatest systematic work of dogmatic and moral theology, the Summa Theologiae. F. Innocentius Apap, O.P., S.T.M., Censor. Art, however, does not pertain to moral science, which is concerned with things to be done, for art is right reason about things to be made, as stated above (I-II:57). Now the matter about which a virtue works what is right, and about which the opposite vice deviates from the right, is the same. Hope GENERAL: Hope in itself (17). New English Translation of St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologiae (Summa Theologica) by Alfred J. Freddoso University of Notre Dame Prima Pars (Part 1) The offering of things to God such as sacrifices (85), oblations and first-fruits (86), tithes (87) and vows (88). The Summa Theologiæ of St. Thomas AquinasSecond and Revised Edition, 1920Literally translated by Fathers of the English Dominican ProvinceOnline Edition Copyright © 2017 by Kevin Knight Nihil Obstat. Question 1. Canonicus Surmont, Vicarius Generalis. 1485, written from 1265–1274; also known as the Summa Theologica or the Summa), as the best-known work of Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274), is a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church, intended to be an instructional guide for theology students, including seminarians and the literate laity. CONNECTED VIRTUES (RELIGION): Religion in itself (81). PARTS (POTENTIAL): Continence (155) and its opposite, incontinence (156).